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damegreywulf:

trust:

i want a relationship but i want them to be like a friend to me, i dont want the relationship to be all about kissing, making out and sex i just wanna hang out with them, and go places, and just have fun wherever we go

This post is surreal because that is exactly how a healthy relationship should be yet we’re convinced this is a weird and unusual thing to ask of our partners.

Who is this “we” you speak of?

This is not a weird or unusual thing. It’s the basis of any healthy relationship, romantic or platonic, sexual or celibate.

Love without friendship is nothing but lust pretending to be something it’s not. 

(Source: trust)

grrootling:

obiwankabrodie:

shotshotshotshotshotshots:

thewellofmyself:

if your mental health is ruining your education and you know it clap your hands

*CLAP CLAP*

if your education is ruining your mental health and you know it clap your hands

*CLAP CLAP*

If your education’s sketchy, and your life is kind of shitty
If the current state of things is a little fucked up, clap your hands.

*clap clap*

*CLAPS AGGRESSIVELY* 

*STANDING OVATION*

crackpotcomics:

crackpotcomics:

I’ve been meaning to do a giveaway for a long time now—first for 500 followers, then 600, then 626—but kept not getting around to it.  So I figured that 650 was a random, yet round enough number to work with, since you guys are all so great!
Rules:
Like or reblog as many times as you want!  You don’t even have to be following me to enter.
Winners will be chosen by a random number generator on September 15th.
First place winner will receive three minicomics of their choice, as well as an inked commission!
Second place winner will receive two minicomics of their choice!
And if this post somehow passes 650 notes by September 15th, both winners will also receive one “Robots Appreciating Nature” poster of their choice!

Preview images and summaries of all available minicomics can be found at my personal web store and my Etsy shop.
Thanks for all your support!  Good luck!

Don’t forget, there’s only one more day before the deadline!
Zoom Info
crackpotcomics:

crackpotcomics:

I’ve been meaning to do a giveaway for a long time now—first for 500 followers, then 600, then 626—but kept not getting around to it.  So I figured that 650 was a random, yet round enough number to work with, since you guys are all so great!
Rules:
Like or reblog as many times as you want!  You don’t even have to be following me to enter.
Winners will be chosen by a random number generator on September 15th.
First place winner will receive three minicomics of their choice, as well as an inked commission!
Second place winner will receive two minicomics of their choice!
And if this post somehow passes 650 notes by September 15th, both winners will also receive one “Robots Appreciating Nature” poster of their choice!

Preview images and summaries of all available minicomics can be found at my personal web store and my Etsy shop.
Thanks for all your support!  Good luck!

Don’t forget, there’s only one more day before the deadline!
Zoom Info
crackpotcomics:

crackpotcomics:

I’ve been meaning to do a giveaway for a long time now—first for 500 followers, then 600, then 626—but kept not getting around to it.  So I figured that 650 was a random, yet round enough number to work with, since you guys are all so great!
Rules:
Like or reblog as many times as you want!  You don’t even have to be following me to enter.
Winners will be chosen by a random number generator on September 15th.
First place winner will receive three minicomics of their choice, as well as an inked commission!
Second place winner will receive two minicomics of their choice!
And if this post somehow passes 650 notes by September 15th, both winners will also receive one “Robots Appreciating Nature” poster of their choice!

Preview images and summaries of all available minicomics can be found at my personal web store and my Etsy shop.
Thanks for all your support!  Good luck!

Don’t forget, there’s only one more day before the deadline!
Zoom Info

crackpotcomics:

crackpotcomics:

I’ve been meaning to do a giveaway for a long time now—first for 500 followers, then 600, then 626—but kept not getting around to it.  So I figured that 650 was a random, yet round enough number to work with, since you guys are all so great!

Rules:

  • Like or reblog as many times as you want!  You don’t even have to be following me to enter.
  • Winners will be chosen by a random number generator on September 15th.
  • First place winner will receive three minicomics of their choice, as well as an inked commission!
  • Second place winner will receive two minicomics of their choice!
  • And if this post somehow passes 650 notes by September 15th, both winners will also receive one “Robots Appreciating Nature” poster of their choice!

Preview images and summaries of all available minicomics can be found at my personal web store and my Etsy shop.

Thanks for all your support!  Good luck!

Don’t forget, there’s only one more day before the deadline!

zacharielaughingalonewithsalad:

cellarspider:

twinkletwinkleyoulittlefuck:

purrsianstuck:

During the Bubonic Plague, doctors wore these bird-like masks to avoid becoming sick. They would fill the beaks with spices and rose petals, so they wouldn’t have to smell the rotting bodies. 

A theory during the Bubonic Plague was that the plague was caused by evil spirits. To scare the spirits away, the masks were intentionally designed to be creepy. 

Mission fucking accomplished

Okay so I love this but it doesn’t cover the half of why the design is awesome and actually borders on making sense.

It wasn’t just that they didn’t want to smell the infected and dead, they thought it was crucial to protecting themselves. They had no way of knowing about what actually caused the plague, and so one of the other theories was that the smell of the infected all by itself was evil and could transmit the plague. So not only would they fill their masks with aromatic herbs and flowers, they would also burn fires in public areas, so that the smell of the smoke would “clear the air”. This all related to the miasma theory of contagion, which was one of the major theories out there until the 19th century. And it makes sense, in a way. Plague victims smelled awful, and there’s a general correlation between horrible septic smells and getting horribly sick if you’re around what causes them for too long.

You can see now that we’ve got two different theories as to what caused the plague that were worked into the design. That’s because the whole thing was an attempt by the doctors to cover as many bases as they could think of, and we’re still not done.

The glass eyepieces. They were either darkened or red, not something you generally want to have to contend with when examining patients. But the plague might be spread by eye contact via the evil eye, so best to ward that off too.

The illustration shows a doctor holding a stick. This was an examination tool, that helped the doctors keep some distance between themselves and the infected. They already had gloves on, but the extra level of separation was apparently deemed necessary. You could even take a pulse with it. Or keep people the fuck away from you, which was apparently a documented use.

Finally, the robe. It’s not just to look fancy, the cloth was waxed, as were all of the rest of their clothes. What’s one of the properties of wax? Water-based fluids aren’t absorbed by it. This was the closest you could get to a sterile, fully protecting garment back then. Because at least one person along the line was smart enough to think “Gee, I’d really rather not have the stuff coming out of those weeping sores anywhere on my person”.

So between all of these there’s a real sense that a lot of real thought was put into making sure the doctors were protected, even if they couldn’t exactly be sure from what. They worked with what information they had. And frankly, it’s a great design given what was available! You limit exposure to aspirated liquids, limit exposure to contaminated liquids already present, you limit contact with the infected. You also don’t give fleas any really good place to hop onto. That’s actually useful.

Beyond that, there were contracts the doctors would sign before they even got near a patient. They were to be under quarantine themselves, they wouldn’t treat patients without a custodian monitoring them and helping when something had to be physically contacted, and they would not treat non-plague patients for the duration. There was an actual system in place by the time the plague doctors really became a thing to make sure they didn’t infect anyone either.

These guys were the product of the scientific process at work, and the scientific process made a bitchin’ proto-hazmat suit. And containment protocols!

reblogging for the sweet history lesson

Women invented all the core technologies that made civilization possible. This isn’t some feminist myth; it’s what modern anthropologists believe. Women are thought to have invented pottery, basketmaking, weaving, textiles, horticulture, and agriculture. That’s right: without women’s inventions, we wouldn’t be able to carry things or store things or tie things up or go fishing or hunt with nets or haft a blade or wear clothes or grow our food or live in permanent settlements. Suck on that.

Women have continued to be involved in the creation and advancement of civilization throughout history, whether you know it or not. Pick anything—a technology, a science, an art form, a school of thought—and start digging into the background. You’ll find women there, I guarantee, making critical contributions and often inventing the damn shit in the first place.

Women have made those contributions in spite of astonishing hurdles. Hurdles like not being allowed to go to school. Hurdles like not being allowed to work in an office with men, or join a professional society, or walk on the street, or own property. Example: look up Lise Meitner some time. When she was born in 1878 it was illegal in Austria for girls to attend school past the age of 13. Once the laws finally eased up and she could go to university, she wasn’t allowed to study with the men. Then she got a research post but wasn’t allowed to use the lab on account of girl cooties. Her whole life was like this, but she still managed to discover nuclear fucking fission. Then the Nobel committee gave the prize to her junior male colleague and ignored her existence completely.

Men in all patriarchal civilizations, including ours, have worked to downplay or deny women’s creative contributions. That’s because patriarchy is founded on the belief that women are breeding stock and men are the only people who can think. The easiest way for men to erase women’s contributions is to simply ignore that they happened. Because when you ignore something, it gets forgotten. People in the next generation don’t hear about it, and so they grow up thinking that no women have ever done anything. And then when women in their generation do stuff, they think ‘it’s a fluke, never happened before in the history of the world, ignore it.’ And so they ignore it, and it gets forgotten. And on and on and on. The New York Times article is a perfect illustration of this principle in action.

Finally, and this is important: even those women who weren’t inventors and intellectuals, even those women who really did spend all their lives doing stereotypical “women’s work”—they also built this world. The mundane labor of life is what makes everything else possible. Before you can have scientists and engineers and artists, you have to have a whole bunch of people (and it’s usually women) to hold down the basics: to grow and harvest and cook the food, to provide clothes and shelter, to fetch the firewood and the water, to nurture and nurse, to tend and teach. Every single scrap of civilized inventing and dreaming and thinking rides on top of that foundation. Never forget that.

Violet Socks, Patriarchy in Action: The New York Times Rewrites History (via o1sv)

Reblogging again for that paragraph because that is the part we forget the most.

(via girlwiki)

Women’s work is the mother of invention

(via rubestar)

(Source: sendforbromina)

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